Coupeville Festival ‘feels’ good for felt, other fiber art

Whidbey News-Times
By: Patricia Guthrie
Photo: By Patricia Guthrie

Photo Caption: Dena Royal, owner of Whidbey Isle Yarns, Gifts and Teas, wears one of the many creations she makes that she’ll be selling at a booth at the Coupeville Arts & Crafts Festival this weekend.

Original content from Whidbey News-Times.
 
It’s a safe bet that some of the 15,000 visitors expected at this weekend’s annual Coupeville Arts &Crafts Show will be leaving with items for their closets.

Wearable art, functional art, fiber art, call it what you will, it’s popular, plentiful and snaring prizes at festivals and art shows regionally and nationally.

A juried art category, fiber creations include felted hats, silken scarves, exquisite capes, bodacious “bun warmers” and soap-and-felt combos that act as mini loofahs.

Fiber art and metal art are particularly trendy, said Carol Moliter, vice president of the Coupeville Festival Association, the non-profit, all-volunteer organization that started the event in 1964 as a way to lure tourists to downtown Coupeville.

“Our vendor committee makes sure there’s a real balance and offering of every arts and style and crafts out there,” she said, adding that many types of fiber art have emerged in the 17 years she’s volunteered with the Coupeville event, often called the longest continuously-running arts festival in the state.

Read the rest of this story at Whidbey News-Times.